May
3
to May 29

Pine in the sand

  • Susan S. and Kenneth L. Wallach Garden (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Pine in the Sand tells a story about unpredictable change while highlighting the often overlooked maintenance and infrastructure enlisted to preserve and stabilize the environment.

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Nov
4
to Jan 18

Dario Robleto: UNKNOWN AND SOLITARY SEAS: DREAMS AND EMOTIONS OF THE 19TH CENTURY

  • Johnson-Kulukundis Family Gallery (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Dario Robleto’s exhibition for the Radcliffe Institute examines the 19th-century origins of the pulse wave as a graphic expression of internal life. Robleto explores the profundity and confusion of this early moment, when ineffable emotional and sensory experiences first became visible as data

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Nov
8
11:00 AM11:00

Art Study Center Seminar: Dario Robleto: Witnessing Sound

Dario Robleto is an artist and writer whose work explores the practice and philosophy of recording and the structures of intergenerational memory. In this seminar, presented in conjunction with the exhibition Winslow Homer: Eyewitness, Robleto will explore the theme of “witnessing” as it relates to auditory and material forms of war testimony.

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Nov
18
4:15 PM16:15

Pulsatility and the Search for Life

Join us for a conversation between the artist Dario Robleto and the astrophysicist Abraham (Avi) Loeb, both of whom engage deeply with pulsatility in their work. Inspired by the role of pulsatility in signaling and communication, this conversation will also serve as an experiment in cross-disciplinary signaling, testing the potential for the arts and sciences to explore a common set of understandings.

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Nov
20
12:00 PM12:00

Beating the Limits: New Heart, New Start

From the earliest heartbeat to the end of your days, the heart carries life and love. What happens when the heart breaks, no longer able to support life? Heart transplantation is the miracle of sharing life. Join Elizabeth Blume, a pediatric heart surgeon, to learn about the technology and science of pediatric heart transplantation and the physician’s perspective of the joys, ethics, and heartbreak of donating life.
Please register and join us.

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Dec
4
12:00 PM12:00

The Cloud of Unknowing (The Heart)

This performance by members of Vision Lab, in conversation with Dario Robleto’s Unknown and Solitary Seas, will creatively repurpose earliest waveform recordings of blood flowing from the heart and in the brain during sleep, dreaming, and various emotional states (1874–1896) to consider how these articulations of the inner body can be translated or thought through in ways that float beneath (or, like a cloud, above) the familiar frameworks of sense-making, and how this type of poetic thinking can be connected to social and political remaking, individually and collectively. Vision Lab’s performance engages text, percussion, dance, and sensory deprivation in interactive and meditative experiments and discussion.
Please register and join us.

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May
9
3:30 PM15:30

LIFT EVERY VOICE AND SING

Kuumba is a Swahili word that means to create and we take that to mean doing what we can with what we have to leave a space better than we found it. This mission permeates and motivates our performances, our community work, and our unabashed celebration of Black art. We firmly believe that Black art sustains and directs our culture; it reminds us of our past, makes us mindful of the present, and gives us hope and guidance for the future. Join us as we celebrate and uplift Beauties through the power of song, and hopefully, you will leave better than you came.

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May
7
3:30 PM15:30

DANCING WITH BEAUTIES WITH AYSHA UPCHURCH

Join us for a moving exploration and interpretation of the stories and processes invoked by Willie Cole's Beauties. Aysha Upchurch is a dancer, instructor, and education consultant whose work, in classrooms and on stages, weaves together youth voice, social inclusion, and decolonized arts education. Part performance and part cypher, she will offer her own danced conversation with the exhibit and invite audience members to listen and contribute with their bodies as well. Upchurch is on faculty at the Harvard Graduate School of Education teaching courses on embodied learning and Hip Hop pedagogy.
Please register and join us.

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May
6
3:30 PM15:30

HOW IRONING BROUGHT ME TO HARVARD: A PERFORMATIVE LECTURE WITH CHLOE CHAPIN

Chapin learned how to iron for her very first job as a dresser with a Shakespeare company in 1991. Twenty years later, she was designing Broadway musicals; 30 years later, she'll graduate from Harvard with a PhD in American Studies. In this lecture, Chapin will share her journey from doing the laundry to researching it for her dissertation—on the history of male evening dress—in a discussion of materiality, tacit knowledge, and ironing tips. 

Chloe Chapin, a former professional costume designer, is now a PhD candidate in the American Studies Program at Harvard University. Chapin has an MFA in design from the Yale School of Drama, an MA in Fashion and Textile Studies from the Fashion Institute of Technology, and an AM in History from Harvard University. She has taught fashion history and costume design at FIT, Parsons The New School of Design, Reed College, and Tufts University, and has been a MacDowell Fellow and a Fulbright Scholar. Her research focuses on fashion and gender—typically the history of men’s suits.
Please register and join us.



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May
3
3:30 PM15:30

WHAT, IF ANYTHING, DO AFRICAN SOCIETIES OWE TO THEIR CITIZENS IN TERMS OF HEALTH(CARE)?

Most accounts of global justice tend to focus on the obligations of developed/rich countries toward poor/developing countries. But the question to identify what developing/poor countries themselves owe to their own citizens has received little attention. Theorists of global justice tend to assume that poor countries need help and implicitly presume that their obligations toward their own citizens, if any, are weaker than developed countries’ and may be limited to accepting help or assistance from developed countries and managing it efficiently and fairly. Relying on the African context and using the case of the human right to health (care), Dr. Thierry Ngosso suggests a theoretical agenda that will challenge that implicit presumption. The focus is only on the big picture on how we must think about the obligations that African societies themselves have regarding the right to health of their own people.

Please register and join us.

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May
3
12:00 PM12:00

Unveiling of Pine in the Sand

Pine in the Sand tells a story about unpredictable change while highlighting the often overlooked maintenance and infrastructure enlisted to preserve and stabilize the environment. 

A mound of sand is planted with a pitch pine and partially contained by a ring of concrete barriers opposite rows of granite benches. Through the seasons, as the sand shifts, the tree acts as a register for change.

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Apr
29
3:30 PM15:30

EDUCATING INCARCERATED YOUTH: INCARCERATION + EDUCATION = EMANCIPATION

Our nation’s incarcerated youth are arguably our most marginalized and forgotten population. While some in our nation continue to facilitate equity conversations, the reality is bleak: Children of color, children of poverty, children with special needs, and children who identify as LGBTQ-NC, are disproportionately represented within our juvenile “justice” system.  And, without a high-quality education program while incarcerated, their growth and potential for excellence are further hindered. Frederick Douglass once said, “If a man is without education…he is a poor prisoner without hope…Education, on the other hand, means emancipation.”  It’s time to emancipate all our youth; and, that means we must provide every child with a high-quality education! Led by Lynette Tannis, an expert on juvenile justice education and adjunct lecturer on education at the Harvard Graduate School of Education.
Please register and join us.

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Apr
18
3:30 PM15:30

ART, INTERPRETATION, AND THE STREET DISPOSITION

It has become commonplace to appeal to the notion of "lived experience" when thinking about how members of established social groups respond to the world differently. But how exactly does this phenomenon work? In other words, why is it possible for people from different socially conditioned backgrounds to perceive some objects of experience in fundamentally distinct ways? The purpose of this presentation is to offer an intuitive way for thinking about how a person's life experience can be shaped by their knowledge or ignorance of certain dominant forms of oppression—ultimately informing how they see certain things external to their consciousness.  Led by Darien Pollock, accompanied by Miguel Santiago.

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Apr
12
3:30 PM15:30

UNBOUNDED: A SALUTE TO THE BEAUTIES

Karlene Griffiths Sekou in collaboration with Vision Lab presents ”Unbounded: A Salute to the Beauties” featuring guest artists Azmera Hammouri-Davis, capoeira and poetry artist, and co-founder of Break the Box; Butana Molefe, a South African drummer and vocal artist, and special interview with Jovonna Jones is a historian and theorist of race, aesthetics, and culture in the United States. She’s committed to black space wherever we find and create it. “Unbounded” also features Vision Lab collaborative artists Kythe Heller, Michelle Bentsman, and Andrew Staffer.
Please register and join us.

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Apr
11
3:30 PM15:30

CIRCLE UP

Join us for a short film and intimate discussion about transforming personal trauma into art, healing, and community justice. A screening of the documentary Circle Upwill be followed by a conversation with filmmaker Julie Mallozzi and film subjects Janet Connors and Clarissa Turner. The film tells the story of a group of mothers seeking justice for their murdered sons—justice that involves not revenge and incarceration, but forgiveness, accountability, and community healing.  
Please register and join us.

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Apr
5
3:30 PM15:30

DIASPORIC DISCOURSE: REFLECTING ON BEAUTIES AS A CONVERSATION ON AFRICAN CITIZENSHIP

Makamo’swork focuses on the brilliance and positivity of the African child’s narrative, and the empowering visual focus on girls in particular. He works with media ranging from charcoal and acrylic to silk screen and oil paint. Makamo has exhibited in group and solo shows in South Africa, France, Italy, the United States, Amsterdam, and Scotland, among other places. He was featured on the cover of Time’s 2019 Optimists issue, guest edited by Ava DuVernay. 
Please register and join us.

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Mar
8
12:30 PM12:30

Octavia Butler reading group with Rachel Vogel

Join a book club–style discussion of Octavia Butler’s science fiction, in which participants are encouraged to bring a copy of their favorite book or passage by the author. Readers will begin in the gallery, where they will listen closely to a recording of Butler in the sound work You Got to Make Your Own Worlds (for when Siri is long gone). They will also engage with major recurring themes found in Butler’s work—such as gender, race, power, technology, and the environment—and discuss how they relate to the works in Future Fossil.

Please register and join us.

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Feb
8
12:30 PM12:30

The making of Future Fossil with curator Meg Rotzel

Join the exhibition curator and Radcliffe arts program manager for a tour of the exhibition. Participants will gain an understanding about how the materials and techniques used in fabrication of the artworks underpin the various concepts that run through the exhibition. They will also learn how exhibitions are brought to life in the Johnson-Kulukundis Family Gallery. 

Please register and join us.

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Jan
31
2:00 PM14:00

Gallery talk with artist Clarissa Tossin and curator Meg Rotzel

Clarissa Tossin, a fellow at Radcliffe in 2017–2018, returns to present Future Fossil,a continuation of her work in the Institute’s artist studios. Join the artist and curator for a conversation about the inspiration for the exhibition and the themes that appear throughout. 

Please register and join us.

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Nov
27
3:30 PM15:30

Stairway to Heaven: Henrietta Leavitt and the Cosmic Distance Ladder

  • Johnson-Kulukundis Family Gallery (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Hours: Noon–5 PM, Monday–Saturday

The science and the controversies behind the exhibition’s exploration of cosmic distance with the astrophysicists João Alves RI ’19 and Alyssa Goodman, faculty codirector of the science program. Light reception to follow.
Please register and join us.

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